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chlorpheniramine-pseudoephedrine (generic name)

(klor fen IR a meen; soo doe e FED rin): An upper respiratory combination - It is used to treat the symptoms of allergy and colds

chlorpheniramine-pseudoephedrine

What is this medicine?
CHLORPHENIRAMINE; PSEUDOEPHEDRINE (klor fen IR a meen; soo doe e FED rin) is a combination of an antihistamine and a decongestant. It is used to treat the symptoms of allergy and colds. This medicine will not treat an infection.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.
What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?
Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:
  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • breathing trouble
  • blurred vision
  • difficulty passing urine
  • fast, irregular heartbeat
  • fear, anxiety, restless, tremor
  • hallucinations
  • high or low blood pressure
  • seizures
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • dry mouth, nose, throat
  • headache
  • loss of appetite
  • more sensitive to sunlight
  • passing urine more often
  • stomach upset, nausea
  • trouble sleeping

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I use this medicine?
Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. If this medicine upsets your stomach, take with food or milk. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Patients over 60 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.
NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.
What if I miss a dose?
If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.
What may interact with this medicine?
Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol
  • barbiturates like phenobarbital
  • medicines for blood pressure
  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances
  • medicines for sleep
  • other medicines for cold, cough or allergy
  • stimulant medicines for attention disorders, weight loss, or to stay awake

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?
Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.
What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?
They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • asthma
  • diabetes
  • difficulty passing urine
  • glaucoma
  • heart disease
  • stomach ulcer
  • thyroid disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to chlorpheniramine, pseudoephedrine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding
Can I stop taking the medication if I feel better?
As a general rule, you should always take your medications exactly as prescribed and do not change the dosage or stop taking the medication without first discussing it with your healthcare provider.
I am on so many medications; do I have to take them all?
This is called polypharmacy—many different medications being used at the same time by one person. Sometimes, being on multiple medications is acceptable and appropriate but at other times it may be problematic. If you are receiving your medications from multiple physicians you need to ensure that they all know what medications you are taking. The best way to do this is to make a list of all the medications you are currently using, including all nutritional supplements, homeopathic remedies, vitamins and over-the-counter drugs (if possible, also include all the diseases you have been diagnosed with). Give a copy to every doctor who takes care of you so they have it on file, this way they can avoid duplicating medications and perhaps even try to consolidate some. After every doctor's visit remember to update the list accordingly. Also, as much as you possibly can, try to use the same pharmacy to fill all your prescriptions, this way any potential drug interactions can be caught and averted.

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