Licensed from

ampicillin-sulbactam (generic name)

(am pi SILL in; sul BAK tam): A beta-lactamase inhibitor - It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections

ampicillin-sulbactam

What is this medicine?
AMPICILLIN; SULBACTAM (am pi SILL in; sul BAK tam) is a penicillin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.
What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?
Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:
  • allergic reactions like skin rash or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • chest pain
  • difficulty breathing
  • fever, chills
  • pain or difficulty passing urine
  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
  • seizures
  • unusual bleeding, bruising
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • heartburn
  • nausea, vomiting
  • pain, irritation at the site of injection
  • sore mouth, tongue
  • stomach gas

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should I use this medicine?
This medicine is infused into a vein or injected deep into a muscle. It is usually given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

If you get this medicine at home, you will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. Use exactly as directed. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.
NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.
What if I miss a dose?
If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.
What may interact with this medicine?
  • allopurinol
  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills
  • probenecid
  • some other antibiotics given by injection

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

Who should NOT use this medication?

  • Known hypersensitivity to any penicillin.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?
Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not improve or if you get new symptoms.

Do not treat diarrhea with over the counter products. Contact your doctor if you have diarrhea that lasts more than 2 days or if the diarrhea is severe and watery.

This medicine can interfere with some urine glucose tests. If you use such tests, talk with your health care professional.

Birth control pills may not work properly while you are taking this medicine. Talk to your doctor about using an extra method of birth control.
What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?
They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease
  • mononucleosis
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to ampicillin, other penicillins or antibiotics, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding
Can I stop taking the medication if I feel better?
If you have been diagnosed with a disease for which an antibiotic is needed, you must complete the prescribed course of treatment. Even if you start to feel better, do not skip any doses and remember to take the medication until it is all gone.
I am on so many medications; do I have to take them all?
This is called polypharmacy—many different medications being used at the same time by one person. Sometimes, being on multiple medications is acceptable and appropriate but at other times it may be problematic. If you are receiving your medications from multiple physicians you need to ensure that they all know what medications you are taking. The best way to do this is to make a list of all the medications you are currently using, including all nutritional supplements, homeopathic remedies, vitamins and over-the-counter drugs (if possible, also include all the diseases you have been diagnosed with). Give a copy to every doctor who takes care of you so they have it on file, this way they can avoid duplicating medications and perhaps even try to consolidate some. After every doctor's visit remember to update the list accordingly. Also, as much as you possibly can, try to use the same pharmacy to fill all your prescriptions, this way any potential drug interactions can be caught and averted.
Where can I get more information?
More Information

Follow Yahoo Health on and become a fan on

Follow @YahooHealth on