Licensed from

glucose (generic name)

Glutose (brand name)

treats Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and Failure-to-thrive
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Glyconutrients

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Alternate Title

Dietary saccharides

Synonyms

Ambrotose®, Ambrotose® complex, dietary saccharide, fucose, galactose, glucose, Glycentials®, glycoconjugates, glycobiology, glycoform, glyconutritional, glycoprotein, Manapol®, mannose, N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylneuraminic acid, saccharide, sialic acid, sugars, xylose.

Background

Glyconutrients are dietary supplements that supply sugars such as glucose, galactose, mannose, fucose, xylose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, and N-acetylneuraminic acid. These sugars are thought to be necessary for cells to communicate with each other in the body.

Glyconutrient research (glycobiology) has increased in the last few years. A company called Mannatech is the leading manufacturer of glyconutrient supplements. They market glyconutrients under the product line Ambrotose®.

There is currently a lack of available scientific evidence showing effectiveness for any condition. Advocates of this therapy claim that only glucose and galactose are readily found in a normal diet, and that glyconutrient supplementation is needed to prevent disease states. Critics of glyconutrient therapy argue that the body can synthesize any sugar it requires from protein intake, so unless a person has a genetic mutation, most glyconutrients are not cost-effective.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Glyconutrients may cause a decrease in the number and severity of symptoms in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, more study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Failure-to-thrive: Glyconutrients may cause an increase in weight and height in toddlers with failure-to-thrive. More study is needed to make a strong recommendation.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
AIDS, alcoholism, allergy, Alzheimer's disease, antibacterial, anxiety, asthma, athletic performance, bladder cancer, bone density, brain wave frequency alteration, burns, cancer, canker sores, cataracts, cerebral palsy, chronic fatigue, cognitive function, colitis, cystic fibrosis, depression, diabetes, Down's syndrome, dyslexia, eczema, fever blisters, fibromyalgia, heart disease, hepatitis, herpes, high cholesterol, hormonal imbalances, immune disorders, infections, infections (streptococcal toxic shock syndrome), infertility, inflammation, inflammation (muscle tissue), insomnia, lupus, Lyme disease, memory, menopause, metabolic disorders, multiple sclerosis, muscle mass, muscular dystrophy (adjuvant), myasthenia gravis, myofasical pain, organ transplantation (heart), osteoporosis (prevention), Parkinson's disease, pemphigus vulgaris, periodontal disease, premenstrual syndrome, psoriasis, rash, retinal protection (from detaching), rheumatoid arthritis, sleep, stomatitis, stress, stroke, Sturge Weber syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease, Tourettes, tumor (eye), wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven effective medicinal dose for glyconutrients in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven effective medicinal dose for glyconutrients in children.

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