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nitroglycerin transdermal (generic name)

Minitran (brand name)

(nye troe GLI ser in): An antianginal agent - It relaxes blood vessels, increasing the blood and oxygen supply to your heart
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Nitroglycerin Transdermal patch - 24 hour

What is this medicine?

NITROGLYCERIN (nye troe GLI ser in) is a type of vasodilator. It relaxes blood vessels, increasing the blood and oxygen supply to your heart. This medicine is used to prevent chest pain caused by angina. It will not help to stop an episode of chest pain.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for external use only. Follow the directions on the prescription label. One patch contains a full day's supply of medicine. It is usually worn for 12 to 14 hours a day and removed for 10 to 12 hours. Apply the patch to an area on the upper body that is clean, dry and hairless. Avoid injured, irritated, calloused, or scarred areas. Use a different site each day to prevent skin irritation. Do not cut or trim the patch. Do not use your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop using this medicine suddenly or your symptoms may get worse. Ask your doctor or health care professional how to gradually reduce the dose.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.
NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, apply the patch as soon as you can. Do not wear two patches at the same time unless told to by your doctor or health care professional.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

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Last Updated

July 10, 2009

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