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acetaminophen (generic name)

(a set a MEE noe fen): An analgesic - It is used to treat mild pain and fever
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Acetaminophen Rectal suppository

What is this medicine?

ACETAMINOPHEN (a set a MEE noe fen) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for rectal use only. Do not take by mouth. Wash your hands before and after use. Take off the foil wrapping. Wet the tip of the suppository with cold tap water to make it easier to use. Lie on your side with your lower leg straightened out and your upper leg bent forward toward your stomach. Lift upper buttock to expose the rectal area. Apply gentle pressure to insert the suppository completely into the rectum, pointed end first. Hold buttocks together for a few seconds. Remain lying down for about 15 minutes to avoid having the suppository come out. Do not use more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 3 months of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days (5 days for children), if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Also, check with your doctor if a fever lasts for more than 3 days.

Do not take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or other medicines that contain acetaminophen with this medicine. Too much acetaminophen can be very dangerous and cause an overdose. Always read labels carefully.

Report any possible overdose to your doctor right away, even if there are no symptoms. The effects of extra doses may not be seen for many days.

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Last Updated

March 10, 2009

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